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The Travels of Marco Polo — Volume 2 by Marco Polo and Rustichello of Pisa

This book is not yet featured on Listopia. Community Reviews. Showing Rating details. More filters. Sort order. Dec 31, Amanda Edwards rated it it was ok. Edited from the posthumous papers of Sir H. Elliot, by Prof. FRANZ v. Leipzig, Frescobaldi, etc.

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Firenze, Venezia, With an Introductory Essay by Col. Bruxelles, , 4to. Paris, , 3 vol. Rost in T'oung Pao, VII. Pesth, Darmstadt, HEYD, Prof. Venezia e Torino, Leipzig, , 2 vol. Paris, , 4 vol. Bombay, , seqq. Edited by Francisque-Michel. Firmin-Didot: Paris, Amsterdam, By Major Alex. First edition is cited throughout.

Hanoviae, Paris, , seqq. Venetiis, ; sometimes other editions are cited. Halliwell's Ed. Van der Lith. Marcel Devic. Leide, , 4to. Wilson, Helmstadt, ET EXT.

Madras, His Notes at end of Buerck's German ed. Roma, This name covers the two works entered above under the heading H.


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Lipsiae, See last but one. Shanghai, Washington, , 8vo. Venezia, , seqq. Muenchen, Petersburg, Chap, xxiii. By Jones and Badger. Supplement to D'Herbelot. New York and London, Say English money By oversight, in vol. This would be a clue to difficulties which I do not find dealt with by anybody in a precise or thorough manner; but I can find no evidence for it.

This by decree of 2nd June, , went two to the ducat. We then have: 1. Hence, when Joinville gives the equation of St. There were a variety of coins of lower value in the Levant called Bezants,[11] but these do not occur in our Book. See vol. The Genoa Palm is stated at 9. If the Venice grain be the same as the old Milan grain. See Introd. Essay in vol. For at 3. Pegolotti also assigns 24 grossi to the ducat p. Everybody seems to be tickled at the notion that the Scotch Pound or Livre was only 20 Pence.

Nobody finds it funny that the French or Italian Pound is only 20 halfpence, or less! Tedaldo was still in Paris on the 28th December, , and he appears to have left for the Holy Land after the departure of S. Lewis for Tunis 2nd July, Stein adds the following note: "The practice of witchcraft and the belief in its efficiency have prevailed in Kasmir from early times, and have survived to some extent to the present day; comp. I was very pleased to find that my itinerary agrees with that of Dr.

Stein; this learned traveller sends me the following remarks: "The remark about the absence of birds pp. The legend can be traced by successive evidence in the case of the range north of Kabul. So I was glad that the short halt, which was unavoidable for survey purposes, permitted me to move a light camp close to the summit of the Wakhjir Pass circ. It was a strange sensation for me in this desolate mountain waste to know that I had reached at last the eastern threshold of that distant region, including Bactria and the Upper Oxus Valley, which as a field of exploration had attracted me long before I set foot in India.

Notwithstanding its great elevation, the Wakhjir Pass and its approaches both from west and east are comparatively easy. Stein adds in his notes to me that "Marco Polo's description of the forty days' journey to the E. After leaving Tashkurghan and Tagharma, where there is some precarious cultivation, there is no local produce to be obtained until the oasis of Tashmalik is reached in the open Kashgar plains.

In the narrow valley of the Yamanyar River Gez Defile there is scarcely any grazing; its appearance is far more desolate than that of the elevated Pamirs. It is strange that no certain remains of Nestorian worship can be traced now. Stein's] of the people of the Khotan oasis p.

The very small number of the Chinese garrison of the districts Khotan and Keria only about men bears out this impression.

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Lord Curzon gives the following list of the "eight claimants to the distinction and title of a Pamir": 1 Taghdumbash, or Supreme Head of the Mountains Pamir, lying immediately below and to the north of the Kilik Pass. Stein in Central Asia. Report on a Journey of Archaeological and Topog. After marching back along the Keriya River for four days, I struck to the south-west, and, after three more marches, arrived in the vicinity of Lachin-Ata Mazar, a desolate little shrine in the desert to the north of the Khotan-Keriya route.

Though our search was rendered difficult by the insufficiency of guides and the want of water, I succeeded during the following few days in tracing the extensive ruined site which previous information had led me to look for in that vicinity. Owing to far-advanced erosion and the destruction dealt by treasure-seekers, the structural remains are very scanty indeed.

Rapson, of the British Museum, with the kind permission of Dr.

Stein, has sent me a photograph which we reproduce of coins and miscellaneous objects found at Uzun Tati. From the description sent to me by Mr. Rapson and written by Mr. Andrews, I note that the miscellaneous objects include: "Two fragments of fine Chinese porcelain, highly glazed and painted with Chinese ornament in blue. That on the left is painted on both sides, and appears to be portion of rim of a bowl.

That to the right is slightly coarser, and is probably portion of a larger vessel. A third fragment of porcelain, shown at bottom of photo, is decorated roughly in a neutral brown colour, which has imperfectly 'fluxed. Probably portion of a clasp or buckle. The metal is very thin. The most curious of it all is, however, the statement as to the weapons in question having been introduced into the country from China.

North-China B. Schlegel's paper, adds: "It was not until the reign of the Emperor Yung Le, and on occasion of the invasion of Tonkin in A. He writes pp. I should not be at all surprised if ultimately both Polo's and Schouten's accounts turned out to be myths, both these travellers making their records at a time when the Old World was full of the tales of the New, so that in the end, we may yet find the custom is not, nor ever has been, so widespread as is generally supposed to have been the case. Unless Mr. Ling Roth supposes the Venetian Traveller acquainted with the various theories of the Pre-Columbian discovery of America!!

In Ma Huan's account of the Kingdom of Siam, transl. China B. Regarding Ruck Quills, Sir H. These are from twenty to thirty feet long, and are not at all unlike an enormous quill stripped of the feathering portion'" p. The midrib of these leaves is a very strong, but extremely light and straight pole These poles are often twenty feet or more in length, and the leaves proper consist of a great number of fine and long pinnate leaflets, set at right angles to the midrib, from eighteen to twenty inches long, and about one and a half broad," etc.

He also kindly volunteered to send me a specimen on his return to Zanzibar. This he did not forget, and some time ago there arrived at the India Office not one, but four of these ruc's quills. In the letter which announced this despatch Sir John says "I send to-day per s. No doubt they were sent in Marco Polo's time in exactly the same state, i. They are used for making stages and ladders, and last long if kept dry.

They are also made into doors, by being cut into lengths, and pinned through. The stages are made of three, like tripods, and used for picking cloves from the higher branches. I calculate that if it originally came to a point the whole length would be 45 feet, but, as this would not be so, we may estimate it at 35 to 40 feet. The thick part is deeply hollowed on the upper? The leaflets are all gone, but when entire, the object must have strongly resembled a Brobdingnagian feather.

Compare this description with that of Padre Bolivar in Ludolf, referred to above. Calamus vero a radice usque ad extremitatem longitudine quinque palmorum, densitatis instar brachii moderati, robustissimus erat et durus. Pennulae inter se aequales et bene compositae, ut vix ab invicem nisi cum violentia divellerentur.


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Colore erant valde nigro, calamus colore albo. The last particular, as to colour, I am not able to explain: the others correspond well. I see this tree is mentioned by Captain R. Burton in his volume on the Lake Regions vol. I ought to mention here that some other object has been shown at Zanzibar as part of the wings of a great bird. Sir John Kirk writes that this which he does not describe particularly was in the possession of the Roman Catholic priests at Bagamoyo, to whom it had been given by natives of the interior, who declared that they had brought it from Tanganyika, and that it was part of the wing of a gigantic bird.

On another occasion they repeated this statement, alleging that this bird was known in the Udoe? Add to Wishlist. USD 2.

The Travels of Marco Polo - Wikipedia

Sign in to Purchase Instantly. Explore Now. Buy As Gift. The Travels of Marco Polo, is a 13th-century travelogue written down by Rustichello da Pisa from stories told by Marco Polo when they where emprisoned together in Genoa, describing Polo's travels through Asia, Persia, China, and Indonesia between and and his experiences became at the court of the Mongol leader Kublai Khan. Product Details. Average Review. Write a Review. Related Searches.